Tag: Carver agate field

Fragmented Filament Agate from The Carver Agate Field + Video

Fragmented Filament Agate from The Carver Agate Field + Video

Between gardening, yard work, and carpentry projects, I have been cutting a few stones this summer. The video below gives you a quick look at what I have been up to. Most of the stones are pretty, but one in particular (the fragmented filament agate) looks like a bottle full of eyebrows or eyelashes. You may ask “What the hell is a fragmented filament agate?” Well, I am going to tell you. Nodules, geodes and agates often form in the inside of gas bubbles that form in lava. The bubbles form while the lava is still hot and pliable. Later, after the lava has cooled, water containing silica and minerals permeate the lava and cracks in the lava entering the ‘bubble’ (technically called a vesicle or vug). Some of these minerals and silica will form a thin layer on the inside of the bubble. This thin layer sometimes scales off […]

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Four Stones I Just Cut and Really, Really Like!!

Four Stones I Just Cut and Really, Really Like!!

Photos 1 and 2: The huge 2 1/4″ cabs were each cut from the same Carver agate/jaspagate. Each has spectacular coloration and pattern and a tiny bluish fortification agate to set off the red/yellow/orange/green coloration. Photo 3: This Carver agate came from a geode slab I cut. Enlarge this picture by clicking on it and take a closer look!! One of the most beautiful agates I have cut! The tiny ‘vug’ goes nearly through the stone and is set off by blue banding. Photo 4: Carnelian agate with spectacular gold sagenitic inclusions.

TexasAmethystAgate Museum, Art Gallery, and Shop: A Video Tour and More!

TexasAmethystAgate Museum, Art Gallery, and Shop: A Video Tour and More!

Watch the tour and then read below for more details on the completion of the new headquarters: The Museum The wall shelves display the best and most diverse specimens I have found on The Carver Agate Field. The shelves are made from local cedar trees I cut on my property and had milled by a neighbor on his ‘bandmill’ sawmill. They are rough but work well! The work and equipment tables are all made from wooden pallets I salvaged from the shop construction project. I added wooden legs with roller wheels on each to allow the easy movement of all the tables. They can be locked in place by brakes on each wheel. The table tops are left over sheathing from the building construction project. The black plastic cabinets and drawers also have wheels and brakes. These contain polished museum specimens that could not fit on the wall shelves. The […]

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Carver Geode with New Mystery

Carver Geode with New Mystery

What are the tiny long black crystals inside the small white geode center? Baffles me! I have cut open and looked at literally thousands of The Carver agate field nodules and geodes, but I have never seen this before. I am hoping to find someone to identify what this is. The fact the tiny fragile crystals survived cutting and washing is amazing to me. I hope some of my West Texas rocker friends can help solve this mystery.

Easter Gallery from ‘The Carver’ Agate Field Collection

Easter Gallery from ‘The Carver’ Agate Field Collection

Another two weeks of exploring, cutting and polishing stones from ‘The Carver’ agate field. Please visit the new Maine Gallery entitled ‘Easter Gallery’ to see them. These stones are from several different areas of The Carver agate field, hence, many look quite different. These specimens display some of the best colors and patterns. Try viewing them on a large screen if you can. Also try to see the amazing stones’ structure via enlargement. Not included in this gallery is another ‘first time seen’ from ‘The Carver’ agate field. The next posting will feature this ‘first’!

Finally: New Shop Up and Running! AND a new Photo Gallery!

Finally: New Shop Up and Running! AND a new Photo Gallery!

Months behind schedule, the shop is making rocks shiny again, although the building is not yet complete. So much for ‘getting done before the snow flies!’ The silversmith shop is built, but I have yet to find my smithing tools which are in ‘below zero’ storage. I have so many 5 gallon buckets of as yet uncut ‘Carver’ stones, it will no doubt take a few years to complete the intensive high grading. Not a problem I mind having, since the most fun (after collecting in the field) is cutting the stones open and seeing the amazing beauty and diversity of colors and agate/jasper types awaiting my eyes. I’ll be sharing this amazing diversity of color, patterns and agate types as I cut and polish. For now, I am showing the new discoveries so far since the shop reopening. These are the result of opening just ONE tub of rocks […]

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Rock & Gem Magazine Gets It Right

Rock & Gem Magazine Gets It Right

Rock & Gem Magazine’s three articles about The Carver Agate Field have now been published–with a necessary correction to the latest article which appeared in the December issue (see the cover below). The three articles are: The New Carver Agate Field: Is It Worth The Hype? Rock & Gem Magazine vol. 47, issue #8 (August 2017) The Unicorn Citrine Scepter and Yellow Agates. Rock & Gem Magazine vol. 48, issue #8 (August 2018) Captivating Find at the Carver Agate Field: Geological Mystery Draws Interest, Rock and Gem Magazine vol. 50, issue #10 (October 2020) the correction The most recent article and correction is the latest geological mystery solved by my geologist friend, Bill Halepeska, and me. This Rock & Gem article and its correction tracks in abbreviated form the geological mystery we discovered on The Carver–which we believe we have solved. Click the image for a larger, more readable version. […]

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NEW Article + Correction in Rock and Gem Magazine, October 2020

NEW Article + Correction in Rock and Gem Magazine, October 2020

In October, Rock & Gem Magazine published the article geologist Bill Halepeska and I had authored in volume 50, issue 10. There were, unfortunately, factual errors that occurred during the editing process. Here at last is the published article, along with the correction. Click each image to open up a larger version for easier reading. And the Correction

Rock & Gem Article about The Carver Agate Field Published

Rock & Gem Article about The Carver Agate Field Published

The October Rock & Gem Magazine article entitled “Captivating Find at The Carver Agate Field,” by John L. Carver and Bill Halepeska, has been published. Unfortunately, it was published with significant factual errors which occurred in Rock & Gem editing of the original article submitted. Rock & Gem has agreed to correct the editing errors in an upcoming issue. When the corrections are published by Rock & Gem, TexasAmethystAgate.com will post the article here together with the corrections. In the meantime, the original submission to Rock & Gem has been posted on this site and can be viewed now. Here’s the cover of the October 2020 issue of Rock & Gem and the first pages of the article, to give you a taste of things to come. Cover First Page Second Page

Rock & Gem Magazine October 2020: “Captivating Find At The Carver Agate Field” reviewed

Rock & Gem Magazine October 2020: “Captivating Find At The Carver Agate Field” reviewed

In October 2020, Rock & Gem Magazine published an article, “Captivating Find At the Carver Agate Field,” by John Carver and Bill Halepeska. The article as published by Rock & Gem is an abridged, edited version of the original work submitted to Rock & Gem by Carver and Halepeska. The Rock & Gem article in its summary captioned “Authors’ Opinions” incorrectly states that Bill and I came to different geological conclusions. The fact is just the opposite. We collaborated extensively and reached consensus that the ‘deep pit’ nodules and geodes formed in and then weathered out of gas bubbles formed in lava before hardening. Since these nodules and geodes are only in one small area of the ‘deep pit’, we do not believe that they were formed where found, nor weathered out in their current location. We both believe they were formed elsewhere (in the Paisano volcano, several miles to […]

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